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First evidence of human-caused climate change melting the West Antarctic ice sheet

12 August 2019

A new study published this week reveals the first evidence of a direct link between human-induced global warming and melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. UK-US researchers say that curbing greenhouse gas emissions now could reduce the future sea-level contribution from this region.

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Arctic sea-ice loss has ‘minimal influence’ on severe cold winter weather

12 August 2019

The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice through climate change has only a "minimal influence" on severe cold winter weather across Asia and North America, new research has shown.

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International climate report confirms 2018 was 4th warmest year on record for planet

12 August 2019

A new State of the Climate report confirmed that 2018 was the fourth warmest year in records dating to the mid-1800s.

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July breaks global heat record, on scorching European weather

05 August 2019

July 2019 was the warmest month across the globe ever recorded, according to data released Monday by the European Union's satellite-based Earth observation network.

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NASA Targets Coastal Ecosystems with New Space Sensor

01 August 2019

NASA has selected a space-based instrument under its Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) portfolio that will make observations of coastal waters to help protect ecosystem sustainability, improve resource management, and enhance economic activity.

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Washed up: Sargassum blankets beaches

30 July 2019

Over the last month, massive quantities of the Sargassum seaweed have been washing up on the shores of Mexico, Florida in the US and some Caribbean islands, creating a serious environmental problem and causing havoc for the tourist industry. ESA has been tracking this slimy infestation.

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NASA Tracks Wildfires From Above to aid Firefighters Below

29 July 2019

Every evening from late spring to early fall, two planes lift off from airports in the western United States and fly through the sunset, each headed for an active wildfire, and then another, and another. From 10,000 feet above ground, the pilots can spot the glow of a fire, and occasionally the smoke enters the cabin, burning the eyes and throat.

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Copernicus Sentinel-2 helps to identify groundwater dependent ecosystems

25 July 2019

The identification and location of groundwater‐dependent ecosystems are the first move in protecting and managing them. Such identifications are challenging where the surface signs of groundwater are not obvious. Copernicus Sentinel-2 data are lending a hand in establishing these ecosystems.

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Expanding our knowledge of Arctic Ocean bathymetry

24 July 2019

Our knowledge of the depth and shape of the Arctic Ocean floor – its bathymetry – is insufficient. Owing to year-round sea-ice coverage and the cost of research in this remote region, much of the Arctic Ocean's bathymetry has remained a mystery, until now.

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Cubesats Allow High Spatiotemporal Estimates of Satellite-Derived Bathymetry

23 July 2019

Cubesats allow high spatiotemporal estimates of satellite-derived bathymetry recent study by Dimitris Poursanidis, Dimos Traganos, Chrysoulakis Nektarios and Peter Reinartz on this subject shows.

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Monitoring Earth’s skin heat for crops and climate

22 July 2019

A bright red twin-engined aircraft, equipped with ultra-high-resolution thermal imaging technology has been scouring the agricultural heartlands of Europe this summer. It was no search and rescue exercise, but an initial step towards building a proposed new satellite system capable of recording the temperature of Earth's skin in intricate detail.

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NASA's ARIA Team Maps California Quake Damage

13 July 2019

A week after two strong earthquakes struck near the city of Ridgecrest in Southern California, NASA scientists and engineers continue to analyze satellite data for information on fault slips and ruptures. Their observations are helping local authorities assess damage and will also provide useful information to engineers for designing resilient structures that can withstand ruptures like the ones created by the latest quakes.

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Using satellite information to help rebuild after a disaster

12 July 2019

ESA and the Asian Development Bank have joined forces to help the Indonesian government use satellite information to guide the redevelopment following the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the provincial capital of Palu and surroundings last year.

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Modelling tides in the Arctic Ocean

11 July 2019

We are all aware of the ebb and flow of the tide every day, but understanding tidal flow is important for a range of maritime activities and environmental monitoring, such as search and rescue operations, shipping routes and coastal erosion. The Arctic Ocean tides are particularly difficult to understand, but a new tidal model produced using ESA satellite data may shed some light on what is happening in this remote area.

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Copernicus Sentinels improve monitoring of coastal ecosystems

11 July 2019

An early detection of changing patterns and altering ecosystems in coastal wetlands can prevent irreversible biodiversity loss and assist in the identification of problematic areas. The Copernicus Sentinel missions are now providing vital information to help visualise and explain trends to policy makers.

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NASA Satellites Find Biggest Seaweed Bloom in the World

08 July 2019

An unprecedented belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico—and it's likely here to stay. Scientists at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg's College of Marine Science used NASA satellite observations to discover and document the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, dubbed the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt, as reported in Science.

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Managing Freshwater Across the United States

05 July 2019

The varied landscapes of the United States have unique relationships with water. On the East Coast, rain is a regular occurrence. In the West, drought is a constant threat. Rivers and lakes fed by rainfall, snowmelt or a mix of both provide two-thirds of the country's drinking water while also supporting agriculture.

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What’s happening to Greenland’s ice?

05 July 2019

Heatwave conditions catapulted Greenland into an early Arctic summer in June, prompting widespread melting across its icesheet surface, according to researchers at the Danish Meteorological Institute.

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Copernicus Sentinel-2 helps to safeguard mountain pastoral systems

28 June 2019

The Peneda-Gerês National Park in northeast Portugal has been home to wild ponies for around 2500 years. Today, it also provides a rich habitat for wolves, foxes, wild boars, ibex, and deer. It also hosts otters, fish, frogs, salamanders, 147 different bird species (many migratory) and 15 bat species. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites are helping to safeguard this mountainous habitat.

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Satellites to the rescue after natural disasters

28 June 2019

Natural disasters showcase the widespread utility of satellite imagery. After earthquakes, landslides, hurricanes and floods, government agencies, nonprofits and emergency responders often turn to electro optical and radar imagery to gauge the severity of the damage, plan rescues, deliver aid and begin rebuilding campaigns.

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