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Greek researchers enlist EU satellite against Aegean sea litter

23 April 2019

Knee-deep in water on a picture-postcard Lesbos island beach, a team of Greek university students gently deposits a wall-sized PVC frame on the surface before divers moor it at sea.

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15+ great reads for your Earth Day week

21 April 2019

It's that time again to reaquaint yourself with the health and well-being of our planet. We know what you're thinking … but it's not all bad news. NOAA scientists are using their expertise and innovation to help to solve Earth's biggest challenges.

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Illuminating Gases in The Sky: NASA Technology Pinpoints Potent Greenhouse Gases

19 April 2019

Whether they're idyllic floating cotton balls on an otherwise blue sky or ominous grey swirls that block the sun, clouds all begin as an invisible dot of water vapor. This elusive gas has been tricky to measure and track – until now. Research scientists at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, have created a new airborne instrument that can directly measure water vapor and floating particles in the atmosphere. The new data will help check the accuracy of satellite measurements, and improve weather and climate forecasts.

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Copernicus Sentinel-2 improves observations of lakes and water bodies

16 April 2019

The complete drying-up of Lake Aculeo in Chile was captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite, enabling scientists to follow the water surface extent at high frequency, and thus witness this dramatic loss.

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Can you spot ocean plastic from space?

12 April 2019

Scientists are working on a technique to track plastic debris in the ocean from space.

It's extremely challenging, especially since the individual pieces of litter are smaller than the minimum-sized objects that satellites can resolve.

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Warm autumn winds could strain Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf

11 April 2019

The Antarctic Peninsula is the northernmost part of Earth's coldest continent, making it particularly vulnerable to a changing global climate. Surface melting of snow and ice initiated the breakup of the northernmost Larsen A ice shelf in 1995, followed in 2002 by the Larsen B ice shelf to the south, which lost a section roughly the size of Rhode Island.

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Improving water resources management with satellite data

08 April 2019

An extensive review reveals that remote sensing is changing the way we manage water resources and suggests that the coming years will bring both exciting advancements and new challenges.

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Glaciers lose nine trillion tonnes of ice in half a century

08 April 2019

When we think of climate change, one of the first things to come to mind is melting polar ice. However, ice loss isn't just restricted to the polar regions. According to research published today, glaciers around the world have lost well over 9000 gigatonnes (nine trillion tonnes) of ice since 1961, raising sea level by 27 mm.

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Antarctic: 'No role' for climate in Halley iceberg splitting

05 April 2019

When a giant iceberg breaks away from near Britain's Halley research base, it won't be because of climate change.

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Preserving heritage data at ESA

05 April 2019

Why is archiving and curating heritage satellite data so fundamentally important? How can heritage data from old satellites be used to compare with current findings?

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NASA Begins Final Year of Airborne Polar Ice Mission

04 April 2019

This is the last year for Operation IceBridge, NASA's most comprehensive airborne survey of ice change. Since the launch of its first Arctic campaign in spring 2009, IceBridge has enabled discoveries ranging from water aquifers hidden within snow in southeast Greenland, to the first map indicating where the base of the massive Greenland Ice Sheet is thawed, to detailed depictions of the evolving Arctic sea ice cover and the thickness of the overlying snow.

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Tracking our resources through satellite imagery

03 April 2019

Looking up towards the stars at night, the sky can give the impression of being empty and infinite. In reality, space is getting more and more crowded every day.

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From local measurements to international agreements: progress and achievements in coordinating the Copernicus In Situ Component

28 March 2019

In situ data, of various types, is an integral and important part of Copernicus products and services. We need this data to validate satellite images, generate observations not accessible from space, for instance, from deep within the ocean, and provide background maps for the Copernicus Services. As coordinator of the Copernicus In Situ Component, the European Environment Agency (EEA) is in charge of improving the access to in situ data, developing partnerships with data providers, and keeping track of the in situ data needs of the Copernicus Services. In this article, we take a look at recent progress and achievements from the Copernicus In Situ Component, showing how it supports the Copernicus Services.

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EU provides further support for Mozambique following Cyclone Idai

28 March 2019

At the request of Mozambique, the EU Civil Protection Mechanism has been activated to help those affected by the devastating impact of cyclone Idai. The EU is providing €3.5 million in humanitarian aid for Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe as well as €250 000 to Mozambique and Malawi Red Cross Societies.

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Help NASA Measure Trees with Your Smartphone

26 March 2019

Healthy forests play an crucial role in Earth's ecosystem as growing trees take up carbon from the atmosphere. NASA satellites and airborne missions study forests to see how carbon moves through ecosystems – and now citizen scientists can help investigate this key question as well by using their smartphone to measure tree height.

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Satellites key to addressing water scarcity

22 March 2019

Today is World Water Day, but with millions of people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe struggling to cope in the aftermath of Cyclone Idai, the notion of water shortages may not be at the forefront of our minds right now. Even so, floods, like we see here, lead to real problems accessing clean water. Whether the problem is inundation or water scarcity, satellites can help monitor this precious resource.

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Copernicus Sentinels become powerful tool in biodiversity conservation

22 March 2019

The conservation and protection of biodiversity is a fundamental activity of protected areas, such as the Samaria National Park, in Greece. The use of data from the Copernicus Sentinels, combined with geodiversity variables, are proving to be fundamental in monitoring certain areas where the Podarcis cretensis endemic lizard is found.

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Land-cover dynamics unveiled

21 March 2019

Billions of image pixels recorded by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission have been used to generate a high-resolution map of land-cover dynamics across Earth's landmasses. This map also depicts the month of the peak of vegetation and gives new insight into land productivity.

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Arctic Sea Ice 2019 Wintertime Extent Is Seventh Lowest

20 March 2019

Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. The 2019 wintertime extent reached on 13 March ties with 2007's as the 7th smallest extent of winter sea ice in the satellite record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA.

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USAID and NASA Harness Science, Technology for Amazon Sustainability

15 March 2019

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) with support from NASA have initiated activities for SERVIR-Amazonia, a five-year effort that will use NASA's unique observations of Earth to address environmental and development challenges in the Amazon Basin.

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