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Climate data from air, land, sea and ice in 2013 reflect trends of a warming planet

17 July 2014

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In 2013, the vast majority of worldwide climate indicators-greenhouse gases, sea levels, global temperatures, etc.-continued to reflect trends of a warmer planet, according to the indicators assessed in the State of the Climate in 2013 report, released online on 17 July 2014 by the American Meteorological Society.

Scientists from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., served as the lead editors of the report, which was compiled by 425 scientists from 57 countries around the world. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events, and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments on air, land, sea, and ice.

"These findings reinforce what scientists for decades have observed: that our planet is becoming a warmer place," said NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D. "This report provides the foundational information we need to develop tools and services for communities, business, and nations to prepare for, and build resilience to, the impacts of climate change."

The report uses dozens of climate indicators to track patterns, changes, and trends of the global climate system, including greenhouse gases; temperatures throughout the atmosphere, ocean, and land; cloud cover; sea level; ocean salinity; sea ice extent; and snow cover. These indicators often reflect many thousands of measurements from multiple independent datasets. The report also details cases of unusual and extreme regional events, such as Super Typhoon Haiyan, which devastated portions of Southeast Asia in November 2013.

Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Image credit: NOAA Cimate / National Snow and Ice Data Center - Arctic sea ice in September 2013